Paul Cashin Architects - The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire Progresses

Site Update on a scheme to refurbish, renovate and extend the Fox public house in Crawley, Hampshire.

The existing building is a Grade II listed property dating from the early 1800's that has fallen into a state of dilapidation after being left unused for a number of years.

Historically, the listed property was once split through the centre by an open passageway for horse and cart. Over time this was eventually incorporated into the fabric of the building. A number of outbuildings occupy the site that were once used as guest house accommodation.

The scheme intends to revitalise the public house by transforming it into a successful, high quality, gastro-pub come restaurant. The aspired standard of the establishment is at such a level that it is hoped that it may act as a destination that people may seek to travel to from the wider surrounding area. In turn, this may help to rejuvenate the locality and community.

The design of the project is based around sympathetically renovating the existing Grade II listed property, bringing it to a suitable useable standard while celebrating and restoring many of its historical attributes. Alongside this, a new contemporary extension is proposed that will incorporate a large dining space and toilet block. This element takes the form of a series of three articulated pitched roofs, reminiscent of rural and agricultural vernacular forms. These are arranged and articulated with large expanses of glazing that provide a connection with the outdoors and bring forth the impression of a series of interconnected outbuildings around a number of walled courtyard spaces. These will be dressed in a black stained timber cladding with accent materials of sand coloured brick walls.

Within the dining area, the eaves of the roof profile will be left open, exposing the timber structure and creating a vaulted, airy space as a contrast to the intimate atmosphere and bustle of the fine dining experience.

Paul Cashin Architects have been delivering this project in collaboration with Design Engine Architects (www.designengine.co.uk).

 

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

 The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

 The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

Paul Cashin Architects - Hillcroft House, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire Technical Design to Start Next Month

Technical design for Hillcroft, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire due to start next month.

Hillcroft is a project for a replacement dwelling at the edge of the settlement boundary of the village of Twyford, near Winchester in Hampshire.


The site is located on a slopped patch of land rising from front to back. Expansive and open views are available looking over the fields to the Northeast, down to Twyford Waterworks. Similar landscape views are available to the front of the site over to houses situated at the top of opposing hills and fields.


The existing building on site is a small detached converted bungalow. The state of the property is of poor condition and uninhabitable.


The clients wish to transform the site into their new home by building a replacement new build family house more suited to the surrounding context and maximising the potential of the site.
As the site is the end or last house along a run of residential properties, constructing a replacement dwelling provides the opportunity to design a building better suited to the site conditions and proportions, and making the most of the available views. As well as this, the new building will improve upon sustainable and energy efficient requirements.

The applicant wishes for the interior design and layout of the property to draw influence from Scandinavian architecture and the concept of the ‘allrum’ - of living spaces that feel semi open-plan in nature and flow from one to the next.

The external appearance of the proposal is influenced by the rural environment and wider rural Hampshire context. There is a focus on local and natural materials articulated in a contemporary form.

The concept originates with the typical pitched roof form of a traditional house. This shape is located such that the gable-end (smaller side) faces the street to reduce visual mass. Dissecting the house into two forms (primary and secondary) further reduces visual mass.

These two elements are elongated - relating to barn vernacular. The smaller form is then slipped backwards to establish a hierarchy between the two elements - one main larger element and a set back smaller, secondary subservient element. This draws on similarities between the rural notion of a main building and an outbuilding. A different articulation in the timber cladding across the elements further distinguishes the two forms and reduce visual mass.

The design needs to take into account and make the most of the existing changes in level, in order that the design develops a strong relationship to the site. In plan, the proposal is suited to the long linear nature of the site. The slipped form creates a front entrance courtyard and rear living courtyard. The two forms can be stepped according to the naturally sloping site, responding directly to the site constraints and context.


The layout is arranged according to the passage of arriving at the site and using the house. From parking, to entering the house, using the communal spaces and proceeding to the bedroom spaces located towards the rear of the scheme.


The entrance to the house is in the larger of the two elements and contains the main living spaces. The smaller element consists of the more private spaces, such as the bedrooms. The new design takes advantage of the surrounding views to the Waterworks, the fields opposite and the immediate rear garden.

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

 Paul Cashin Architect - Hillcroft, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire

Paul Cashin Architect - Hillcroft, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire

Paul Cashin Architects - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire Site Progress

The Herdsman’s Cottage project is progressing on site.

The project is for a contemporary new build dwelling replacing an existing house of the same name within the Hampshire countryside in the village of Upham, near Winchester. Paul Cashin Architects are undertaking the scheme alongside local award-winning architecture practice, Design Engine.

As work on site progresses, the form of the proposed building is beginning to appear.

The proposal replaces the existing cottage and associated outbuildings that had fallen into a state of disrepair.

The site is flanked by a road to one side and sits as part of a small development of other dwellings and outbuildings, many of which are re-utilised from their formerly agricultural origins. The wider surroundings include open views across neighbouring fields and the countryside of the South Downs National Park.

The form of the design is a composition of two flat roof elements. The largest being a linear, single storey form that incorporates arrival, service and living spaces, whilst the second, two-storey element, forms the bedroom spaces.

The new house will be contemporary in appearance with red brick, complemented by aluminium panel accents with large feature expanses of aluminium-framed glazing surrounds. Inside, bespoke joinery and consideration of fixture details will create a high level of finish.

The design of the new house has a contemporary architecture aesthetic with carefully considered details relating the scheme to the surroundings such as the framing of certain countryside views helps to root the house into place.

 Paul Cashin Architect - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

Paul Cashin Architect - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

 Paul Cashin Architect - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

Paul Cashin Architect - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

 Paul Cashin Architect - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

Paul Cashin Architect - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

 Paul Cashin Architect - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

Paul Cashin Architect - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

Paul Cashin Architects - Weeke House Starting on Site in October

Paul Cashin Architests are pleased that Weeke House is to start on site in October 2018.

The project includes renovating and extending a Grade II Listed dwelling in Winchester, Hampshire.

Due to the listed status of the property, careful investigation was conducted into the history and formation of the dwelling in order to discover the age of different parts of the building fabric.

The existing property has an unassuming appearance from the roadside and upon entering through the front door, it feels like a typical family home.

Passing through the ‘main’ house portion, you arrive at a single storey conservatory style rear extension containing dining and kitchen spaces.

This acts as an intermediary space as you continue into a large double height room with open mezzanine above that acts as a living space and office. This portion of the property was once an old billiards room. and there is a large roof lantern above that floods light into the space.

This part of the property is hidden from the roadside and provides a reveal moment in contrast to the more usual spaces. This space is large and flooded with light via a roof lantern two storeys above.

The concept is to create similar unexpected reveal moments across other parts of the property.

The infill extension area was highlighted as currently the least successful space, therefore, the proposal includes replacing this with a new contemporary extension including new open-plan kitchen and dining areas.

This more modest space aims to create an opposing atmosphere to the billiards room. It will be a darker space, centred around the use of natural materials and textured surfaces such as exposed roof rafters, polished venetian plastered walls and a dark modern kitchen.

This provides contrast to the billiards room but also helps to direct the view outwards towards the walled garden through large Crittall style windows that both relate to the era of the existing property and a contemporary aesthetic. Externally, black fibre cement cladding helps the extension stand out against the red brick of the existing so that it can be seen as a modern architectural intervention to the original property.

The first floor is to be transformed into a large master suite. The loft space will be opened up so that the bedroom benefits from a vaulted ceiling that reveals a hidden high-level circular window, part of the original building fabric and character, that was previously un-utilised in the loft.

Internal walls will be reconfigured creating an open-plan feeling to the master suite. The bedroom and walk-in-wardrobe areas will be separated by a freestanding chimney breast with modern fireplace that acts as a focal point and island in the space.

Overall, the proposal aims to transform the entire property and involves a new extension alongside a full renovation, re-decoration and landscaping elements.

 Paul Cashin Architect - External view of extension, Winchester, Hampshire

Paul Cashin Architect - External view of extension, Winchester, Hampshire

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

Paul Cashin Architects - The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire Progresses

Site Update on a scheme to refurbish, renovate and extend the Fox public house in Crawley, Hampshire.

The existing building is a Grade II listed property dating from the early 1800's that has fallen into a state of dilapidation after being left unused for a number of years.

Historically, the listed property was once split through the centre by an open passageway for horse and cart. Over time this was eventually incorporated into the fabric of the building. A number of outbuildings occupy the site that were once used as guest house accommodation.

The scheme intends to revitalise the public house by transforming it into a successful, high quality, gastro-pub come restaurant. The aspired standard of the establishment is at such a level that it is hoped that it may act as a destination that people may seek to travel to from the wider surrounding area. In turn, this may help to rejuvenate the locality and community.

The design of the project is based around sympathetically renovating the existing Grade II listed property, bringing it to a suitable useable standard while celebrating and restoring many of its historical attributes. Alongside this, a new contemporary extension is proposed that will incorporate a large dining space and toilet block. This element takes the form of a series of three articulated pitched roofs, reminiscent of rural and agricultural vernacular forms. These are arranged and articulated with large expanses of glazing that provide a connection with the outdoors and bring forth the impression of a series of interconnected outbuildings around a number of walled courtyard spaces. These will be dressed in a black stained timber cladding with accent materials of sand coloured brick walls.

Within the dining area, the eaves of the roof profile will be left open, exposing the timber structure and creating a vaulted, airy space as a contrast to the intimate atmosphere and bustle of the fine dining experience.

Paul Cashin Architects have been delivering this project in collaboration with Design Engine Architects (www.designengine.co.uk).

 

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

 The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

 The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

 The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

Paul Cashin Architects - The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire

Site Update on a scheme to refurbish, renovate and extend the Fox and Hounds public house in Crawley, Hampshire.

The existing building is a Grade II listed property dating from the early 1800's that has fallen into a state of dilapidation after being left unused for a number of years.

Historically, the listed property was once split through the centre by an open passageway for horse and cart. Over time this was eventually incorporated into the fabric of the building. A number of outbuildings occupy the site that were once used as guest house accommodation.

The scheme intends to revitalise the public house by transforming it into a successful, high quality, gastro-pub come restaurant. The aspired standard of the establishment is at such a level that it is hoped that it may act as a destination that people may seek to travel to from the wider surrounding area. In turn, this may help to rejuvenate the locality and community.

The design of the project is based around sympathetically renovating the existing Grade II listed property, bringing it to a suitable useable standard while celebrating and restoring many of its historical attributes. Alongside this, a new contemporary extension is proposed that will incorporate a large dining space and toilet block. This element takes the form of a series of three articulated pitched roofs, reminiscent of rural and agricultural vernacular forms. These are arranged and articulated with large expanses of glazing that provide a connection with the outdoors and bring forth the impression of a series of interconnected outbuildings around a number of walled courtyard spaces. These will be dressed in a black stained timber cladding with accent materials of sand coloured brick walls.

Within the dining area, the eaves of the roof profile will be left open, exposing the timber structure and creating a vaulted, airy space as a contrast to the intimate atmosphere and bustle of the fine dining experience.

Paul Cashin Architects have been delivering this project in collaboration with Design Engine Architects (www.designengine.co.uk).

 

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

 The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

 The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

The Fox, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - Paul Cashin Architects

Paul Cashin Architects - Hillcroft House, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire Receives Planning

Hillcroft, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire receives planning permission.

Hillcroft is a project for a replacement dwelling at the edge of the settlement boundary of the village of Twyford, near Winchester in Hampshire.
The site is located on a slopped patch of land rising from front to back. Expansive and open views are available looking over the fields to the Northeast, down to Twyford Waterworks. Similar landscape views are available to the front of the site over to houses situated at the top of opposing hills and fields.
The existing building on site is a small detached converted bungalow. The state of the property is of poor condition and uninhabitable.
The clients wish to transform the site into their new home by building a replacement new build family house more suited to the surrounding context and maximising the potential of the site.
As the site is the end or last house along a run of residential properties, constructing a replacement dwelling provides the opportunity to design a building better suited to the site conditions and proportions, and making the most of the available views. As well as this, the new building will improve upon sustainable and energy efficient requirements.

The applicant wishes for the interior design and layout of the property to draw influence from Scandinavian architecture and the concept of the ‘allrum’ - of living spaces that feel semi open-plan in nature and flow from one to the next.

The external appearance of the proposal is influenced by the rural environment and wider rural Hampshire context. There is a focus on local and natural materials articulated in a contemporary form.

The concept originates with the typical pitched roof form of a traditional house. This shape is located such that the gable-end (smaller side) faces the street to reduce visual mass. Dissecting the house into two forms (primary and secondary) further reduces visual mass.

These two elements are elongated - relating to barn vernacular. The smaller form is then slipped backwards to establish a hierarchy between the two elements - one main larger element and a set back smaller, secondary subservient element. This draws on similarities between the rural notion of a main building and an outbuilding. A different articulation in the timber cladding across the elements further distinguishes the two forms and reduce visual mass.

The design needs to take into account and make the most of the existing changes in level, in order that the design develops a strong relationship to the site. In plan, the proposal is suited to the long linear nature of the site. The slipped form creates a front entrance courtyard and rear living courtyard. The two forms can be stepped according to the naturally sloping site, responding directly to the site constraints and context.
The layout is arranged according to the passage of arriving at the site and using the house. From parking, to entering the house, using the communal spaces and proceeding to the bedroom spaces located towards the rear of the scheme.
The entrance to the house is in the larger of the two elements and contains the main living spaces. The smaller element consists of the more private spaces, such as the bedrooms. The new design takes advantage of the surrounding views to the Waterworks, the fields opposite and the immediate rear garden.

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

 Hillcroft, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire

Hillcroft, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire

 Hillcroft, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire

Hillcroft, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire

Paul Cashin Architects - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire Site Progress

The Herdsman’s Cottage project is progressing on site.

The project is for a contemporary new build dwelling replacing an existing house of the same name within the Hampshire countryside in the village of Upham, near Winchester. Paul Cashin Architects are undertaking the scheme alongside local award-winning architecture practice, Design Engine.

As work on site progresses, the form of the proposed building is beginning to appear.

The proposal replaces the existing cottage and associated outbuildings that had fallen into a state of disrepair.

The site is flanked by a road to one side and sits as part of a small development of other dwellings and outbuildings, many of which are re-utilised from their formerly agricultural origins. The wider surroundings include open views across neighbouring fields and the countryside of the South Downs National Park.

The form of the design is a composition of two flat roof elements. The largest being a linear, single storey form that incorporates arrival, service and living spaces, whilst the second, two-storey element, forms the bedroom spaces.

The new house will be contemporary in appearance with red brick, complemented by aluminium panel accents with large feature expanses of aluminium-framed glazing surrounds. Inside, bespoke joinery and consideration of fixture details will create a high level of finish.

The design of the new house has a contemporary architecture aesthetic with carefully considered details relating the scheme to the surroundings such as the framing of certain countryside views helps to root the house into place.

 Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

 Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

 Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

 Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Hampshire

IMG_1705.jpg

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

Paul Cashin Architects - Marshall House, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire Progressing On Site

Marshall House is a new contemporary extension to a Grade 2 listed dwelling in the village of Twyford, near Winchester, Hampshire.

The proposal developed through discussion and collaboration with the users and the local Winchester planning authority in order to reach a design solution taking the form of a modern single storey extension providing a dining area, garden room, additional storage, utility and shower room facilities.

Due to the Grade 2 listing of the existing house, extra care and consideration was taken over the layout, impact and appearance of the proposal.

Inside, a refurbished kitchen leads to a glazed link that provides a distinction between the new and the old structures. Ancillary spaces are located off a hallway before the space opens up to a dining area and garden room. Timber flooring and a Birch Plywood finish to the walls and ceiling help to create a sense of cosiness and warmth, added to by a curved hearth and log burner. Full height glazing provides access and views to the garden on two aspects, whilst roof lights let light in from above.

Externally, the contemporary proposal is clad in black timber fins, to offset it against the white painted brickwork of the existing property. The timber cladding draws forward connotations with nature, it’s soft materiality and grain ageing over time. In contrast to the heaviness and boldness of the white painted brick, the timber cladding will help the proposal be viewed as subservient to the existing property.
 

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

 Marshall House, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Marshall House, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

 Marshall House, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Marshall House, Twyford, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Paul Cashin Architects - Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire

Site Update on a scheme to refurbish, renovate and extend the Fox and Hounds public house in Crawley, Hampshire.

The existing building is a Grade II listed property dating from the early 1800's that has fallen into a state of dilapidation after being left unused for a number of years.

Historically, the listed property was once split through the centre by an open passageway for horse and cart. Over time this was eventually incorporated into the fabric of the building. A number of outbuildings occupy the site that were once used as guest house accommodation.

The scheme intends to revitalise the public house by transforming it into a successful, high quality, gastro-pub come restaurant. The aspired standard of the establishment is at such a level that it is hoped that it may act as a destination that people may seek to travel to from the wider surrounding area. In turn, this may help to rejuvenate the locality and community.

The design of the project is based around sympathetically renovating the existing Grade II listed property, bringing it to a suitable useable standard while celebrating and restoring many of its historical attributes. Alongside this, a new contemporary extension is proposed that will incorporate a large dining space and toilet block. This element takes the form of a series of three articulated pitched roofs, reminiscent of rural and agricultural vernacular forms. These are arranged and articulated with large expanses of glazing that provide a connection with the outdoors and bring forth the impression of a series of interconnected outbuildings around a number of walled courtyard spaces. These will be dressed in a black stained timber cladding with accent materials of sand coloured brick walls.

Within the dining area, the eaves of the roof profile will be left open, exposing the timber structure and creating a vaulted, airy space as a contrast to the intimate atmosphere and bustle of the fine dining experience.

Paul Cashin Architects have been delivering this project in collaboration with Design Engine Architects (www.designengine.co.uk).

 

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

 Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

 Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

 Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

 Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Paul Cashin Architects - Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Progressing on Site

The Herdsman’s Cottage project is progressing on site.

The project is for a contemporary new build dwelling replacing an existing house of the same name within the Hampshire countryside in the village of Upham, near Winchester. Paul Cashin Architects are undertaking the scheme alongside local award-winning architecture practice, Design Engine.

As work on site progresses, the form of the proposed building is beginning to appear.

The proposal replaces the existing cottage and associated outbuildings that had fallen into a state of disrepair.

The site is flanked by a road to one side and sits as part of a small development of other dwellings and outbuildings, many of which are re-utilised from their formerly agricultural origins. The wider surroundings include open views across neighbouring fields and the countryside of the South Downs National Park.

The form of the design is a composition of two flat roof elements. The largest being a linear, single storey form that incorporates arrival, service and living spaces, whilst the second, two-storey element, forms the bedroom spaces.

The new house will be contemporary in appearance with red brick, complemented by aluminium panel accents with large feature expanses of aluminium-framed glazing surrounds. Inside, bespoke joinery and consideration of fixture details will create a high level of finish.

The design of the new house has a contemporary architecture aesthetic with carefully considered details relating the scheme to the surroundings such as the framing of certain countryside views helps to root the house into place.

 Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Brick Soffit

Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester, Brick Soffit

 Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester

Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester

 Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester

Herdsman's Cottage, Upham, Winchester

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

Paul Cashin Architects - Weeke House Awarded Planning Permission

Paul Cashin Architests are pleased to have been awarded planning permission for our proposals to  renovate and extend a Grade II Listed dwelling in Winchester, Hampshire.

Due to the listed status of the property, careful investigation was conducted into the history and formation of the dwelling in order to discover the age of different parts of the building fabric.

The existing property has an unassuming appearance from the roadside and upon entering through the front door, it feels like a typical family home.

Passing through the ‘main’ house portion, you arrive at a single storey conservatory style rear extension containing dining and kitchen spaces.

This acts as an intermediary space as you continue into a large double height room with open mezzanine above that acts as a living space and office. This portion of the property was once an old billiards room. and there is a large roof lantern above that floods light into the space.

This part of the property is hidden from the roadside and provides a reveal moment in contrast to the more usual spaces. This space is large and flooded with light via a roof lantern two storeys above.

The concept is to create similar unexpected reveal moments across other parts of the property.

The infill extension area was highlighted as currently the least successful space, therefore, the proposal includes replacing this with a new contemporary extension including new open-plan kitchen and dining areas.

This more modest space aims to create an opposing atmosphere to the billiards room. It will be a darker space, centred around the use of natural materials and textured surfaces such as exposed roof rafters, polished venetian plastered walls and a dark modern kitchen.

This provides contrast to the billiards room but also helps to direct the view outwards towards the walled garden through large Crittall style windows that both relate to the era of the existing property and a contemporary aesthetic. Externally, black fibre cement cladding helps the extension stand out against the red brick of the existing so that it can be seen as a modern architectural intervention to the original property.

The first floor is to be transformed into a large master suite. The loft space will be opened up so that the bedroom benefits from a vaulted ceiling that reveals a hidden high-level circular window, part of the original building fabric and character, that was previously un-utilised in the loft.

Internal walls will be reconfigured creating an open-plan feeling to the master suite. The bedroom and walk-in-wardrobe areas will be separated by a freestanding chimney breast with modern fireplace that acts as a focal point and island in the space.

Overall, the proposal aims to transform the entire property and involves a new extension alongside a full renovation, re-decoration and landscaping elements.

 External view of extension

External view of extension

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

Paul Cashin Architects - Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire Progressing

Paul Cashin Architects are pleased to announce that a scheme to refurbish, renovate and extend the Fox and Hounds public house in Crawley, Hampshire is progressing.

The existing building is a Grade II listed property dating from the early 1800's that has fallen into a state of dilapidation after being left unused for a number of years.

Historically, the listed property was once split through the centre by an open passageway for horse and cart. Over time this was eventually incorporated into the fabric of the building. A number of outbuildings occupy the site that were once used as guest house accommodation.

The scheme intends to revitalise the public house by transforming it into a successful, high quality, gastro-pub come restaurant. The aspired standard of the establishment is at such a level that it is hoped that it may act as a destination that people may seek to travel to from the wider surrounding area. In turn, this may help to rejuvenate the locality and community.

The design of the project is based around sympathetically renovating the existing Grade II listed property, bringing it to a suitable useable standard while celebrating and restoring many of its historical attributes. Alongside this, a new contemporary extension is proposed that will incorporate a large dining space and toilet block. This element takes the form of a series of three articulated pitched roofs, reminiscent of rural and agricultural vernacular forms. These are arranged and articulated with large expanses of glazing that provide a connection with the outdoors and bring forth the impression of a series of interconnected outbuildings around a number of walled courtyard spaces. These will be dressed in a black stained timber cladding with accent materials of sand coloured brick walls.

Within the dining area, the eaves of the roof profile will be left open, exposing the timber structure and creating a vaulted, airy space as a contrast to the intimate atmosphere and bustle of the fine dining experience.

Paul Cashin Architects have been delivering this project in collaboration with Design Engine Architects (www.designengine.co.uk).

 

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

 Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Fox and Hounds, Crawley, Winchester, Hampshire - under construction

Research ... whilst on holiday I enjoyed reading this book by Roger Tyrrell, a study of three Scandinavian architects and the importance of specific context in choosing materials. His photograph of an Aalto brick wall demonstrates the multitude of brick and bond types available to us if we set free our thinking about masonry. Whilst visiting the Balearics I noticed the use of dry stone walling for contemporary homes. Carl Yung said ‘people don’t have ideas, ideas have people’

 Aalto, Utzon, Fehn: Three Paradigms of Phenomenological Architecture by Roger Tyrell

Aalto, Utzon, Fehn: Three Paradigms of Phenomenological Architecture by Roger Tyrell

 Aalto, Utzon, Fehn: Three Paradigms of Phenomenological Architecture by Roger Tyrell

Aalto, Utzon, Fehn: Three Paradigms of Phenomenological Architecture by Roger Tyrell

Paul Cashin Architects Featured in Build It Magazine

Paul Cashin Architects are very pleased to be included in an article feature in Built It magazine's July 2017 edition. The article elaborates on how architects can create 'great homes on tricky plots' and includes a piece on our Thorns Ha-Ha project based near the New Forest.

This project is for a new contemporary dwelling located on the coast in the New Forest, Hampshire. The site is subject to drastically differing land levels, as such the proposed design takes inspiration from this as part of what informs the development of the architecture.

The building straddles two different land levels, the first an elevated position for countryside views, and the second a lowered pasture for grazing. The site has an existing Ha-Ha, which is a man-made wall that divides a field between its functions. The design of the house therefore deals with this change in site level whilst complimenting the flow of the landscape.

Snapped flint bound into masonry walls is selected as the material for each book-end wall of the two main forms of the building.  Timber and white painted brick are the infill materials for walls and cladding, whilst zinc panels create a sharp edge to the roofing. The materials are carefully selected to relate to the countryside surroundings and draw influences from materials found on or nearby the site and the further surrounding vernacular architecture. However, the design is inherently contemporary and the application of these materials help to create an architectural language that is befitting of the site and surrounding area, maintaining a rural countryside feel whilst being a considered contemporary piece of modern architecture.

Inside the house, the lower portion features an open plan living and kitchen space complete with decking and storage rooms.  Above this sits a study and loft area. The upper portion of the house has three bedrooms and a colonnade passage, framing views to the tree lined boundary of the countryside site.

 

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

Paul Cashin Architects Collaboration with CHORA

On Wednesday 14th February, Paul Cashin Architects welcomed Roger Tyrrell and a group of University of Portsmouth undergraduate film students to their office in Winchester to develop and capture the process of refining the key construction details for the extension of Roger's own house project.

The aim of the session being to produce clean, robust and well considered details. The process used the in-office chalk wall to explore details at 1 to 1 scale. Through conversation and drawings, the details were refined and various options explored.

The event was in collaboration with Chora (a new company founded by University of Portsmouth Professor and Architect, Roger Terrell).

CHORA is designed to occupy the current void between the creative practice and Academia. Historically considered as distinct and exclusive, CHORA strives to conjoin these territories, as the contemporary globalised context of the creative and knowledge economies demands. If the currency of the future is creative ideas, CHORA seeks to encourage, facilitate, and support, the conjunction of Praxis and Research within a single entity, and, through the innovative processes, encourage rigorous and informed creative pathways that are intelligent and responsive to current and future societorial demands.

Planning for the project was granted at the end of March. The details will be developed further with the aim of starting work this summer.

The project site is located in a cul-de-sac located on the outskirts of Emsworth town, Hampshire. The existing property is a single storey bungalow with two bedrooms. The client wishes to extend the property in order to gain more generous living spaces which relate to the rear garden, and adapt the existing living spaces to become an additional bedroom and ensuite bathroom.

The core concept design principles being; reduced mass and form, lower ridge height, subservient, contrasting, enclosing, space making.

The proposed extension will sympathetically reflect the scale and proportions of the existing property while providing a precisely detailed contemporary addition. This will be enhanced further by a considered landscape proposal providing diverse wildlife habitats.

The design for the new extension will be constructed of white painted brick, and bituminous corrugated cladding. The pitched roof will also be finished with the same recycled bituminous corrugated cladding giving a sense of wrapping. Deep reveals will provide shade to the more exposed elevations and give depth to the elevation.

The client has a keen interest in wildlife and the natural environment. The landscape proposal draws upon their travels around the world.

As such, the landscape has been an integral aspect of the design development for the proposal, with planting/landscaping designed to enhance and make a dynamic inside outside space that responds to both building and the natural environment.

Paul Cashin Architects Featured in Built It Magazine

Paul Cashin Architects are very pleased to be included in an article feature in Built It magazine's July 2017 edition. The article elaborates on how architects can create 'great homes on tricky plots' and includes a piece on our Thorns Ha-Ha project based near the New Forest.

This project is for a new contemporary dwelling located on the coast in the New Forest, Hampshire. The site is subject to drastically differing land levels, as such the proposed design takes inspiration from this as part of what informs the development of the architecture.

The building straddles two different land levels, the first an elevated position for countryside views, and the second a lowered pasture for grazing. The site has an existing Ha-Ha, which is a man-made wall that divides a field between its functions. The design of the house therefore deals with this change in site level whilst complimenting the flow of the landscape.

Snapped flint bound into masonry walls is selected as the material for each book-end wall of the two main forms of the building.  Timber and white painted brick are the infill materials for walls and cladding, whilst zinc panels create a sharp edge to the roofing. The materials are carefully selected to relate to the countryside surroundings and draw influences from materials found on or nearby the site and the further surrounding vernacular architecture. However, the design is inherently contemporary and the application of these materials help to create an architectural language that is befitting of the site and surrounding area, maintaining a rural countryside feel whilst being a considered contemporary piece of modern architecture.

Inside the house, the lower portion features an open plan living and kitchen space complete with decking and storage rooms.  Above this sits a study and loft area. The upper portion of the house has three bedrooms and a colonnade passage, framing views to the tree lined boundary of the countryside site.

 

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

Paul Cashin Architects - Collaboration with CHORA

On Wednesday 14th February, Paul Cashin Architects welcomed Roger Tyrrell and a group of University of Portsmouth undergraduate film students to their office in Winchester to develop and capture the process of refining the key construction details for the extension of Roger's own house project.

The aim of the session being to produce clean, robust and well considered details. The process used the in-office chalk wall to explore details at 1 to 1 scale. Through conversation and drawings, the details were refined and various options explored.

The event was in collaboration with Chora (a new company founded by University of Portsmouth Professor and Architect, Roger Terrell).

CHORA is designed to occupy the current void between the creative practice and Academia. Historically considered as distinct and exclusive, CHORA strives to conjoin these territories, as the contemporary globalised context of the creative and knowledge economies demands. If the currency of the future is creative ideas, CHORA seeks to encourage, facilitate, and support, the conjunction of Praxis and Research within a single entity, and, through the innovative processes, encourage rigorous and informed creative pathways that are intelligent and responsive to current and future societorial demands.

Planning for the project was granted at the end of March. The details will be developed further with the aim of starting work this summer.

The project site is located in a cul-de-sac located on the outskirts of Emsworth town, Hampshire. The existing property is a single storey bungalow with two bedrooms. The client wishes to extend the property in order to gain more generous living spaces which relate to the rear garden, and adapt the existing living spaces to become an additional bedroom and ensuite bathroom.

The core concept design principles being; reduced mass and form, lower ridge height, subservient, contrasting, enclosing, space making.

The proposed extension will sympathetically reflect the scale and proportions of the existing property while providing a precisely detailed contemporary addition. This will be enhanced further by a considered landscape proposal providing diverse wildlife habitats.

The design for the new extension will be constructed of white painted brick, and bituminous corrugated cladding. The pitched roof will also be finished with the same recycled bituminous corrugated cladding giving a sense of wrapping. Deep reveals will provide shade to the more exposed elevations and give depth to the elevation.

The client has a keen interest in wildlife and the natural environment. The landscape proposal draws upon their travels around the world.

As such, the landscape has been an integral aspect of the design development for the proposal, with planting/landscaping designed to enhance and make a dynamic inside outside space that responds to both building and the natural environment.

 Paul Cashin Architects and Chora detail design collaboration.

Paul Cashin Architects and Chora detail design collaboration.

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

 

Paul Cashin Architects featured in Build It magazine

Paul Cashin Architects are very pleased to be included in an article feature in Built It magazine's July 2017 edition. The article elaborates on how architects can create 'great homes on tricky plots' and includes a piece on our Thorns Ha-Ha project based near the New Forest.

This project is for a new contemporary dwelling located on the coast in the New Forest, Hampshire. The site is subject to drastically differing land levels, as such the proposed design takes inspiration from this as part of what informs the development of the architecture.

The building straddles two different land levels, the first an elevated position for countryside views, and the second a lowered pasture for grazing. The site has an existing Ha-Ha, which is a man-made wall that divides a field between its functions. The design of the house therefore deals with this change in site level whilst complimenting the flow of the landscape.

Snapped flint bound into masonry walls is selected as the material for each book-end wall of the two main forms of the building.  Timber and white painted brick are the infill materials for walls and cladding, whilst zinc panels create a sharp edge to the roofing. The materials are carefully selected to relate to the countryside surroundings and draw influences from materials found on or nearby the site and the further surrounding vernacular architecture. However, the design is inherently contemporary and the application of these materials help to create an architectural language that is befitting of the site and surrounding area, maintaining a rural countryside feel whilst being a considered contemporary piece of modern architecture.

Inside the house, the lower portion features an open plan living and kitchen space complete with decking and storage rooms.  Above this sits a study and loft area. The upper portion of the house has three bedrooms and a colonnade passage, framing views to the tree lined boundary of the countryside site.

 

For more examples of our contemporary architecture designs please view our selected projects here, or if you would like to discuss a project please view our contact page here.

Screen Shot 2018-02-23 at 09.22.19 copy.jpg
Screen Shot 2018-02-23 at 09.22.31 copy.jpg
Screen Shot 2018-02-23 at 09.30.47 copy.jpg